Daily Star LogoOpinions


Bacolod City, Philippines Saturday, August 27, 2016
Front Page
Negros Oriental
Star Business
Opinion
Sports
Star Life
People & Events

 

Twinkling
with Ninfa Leonardia
OPINIONS

No to unsightly ‘decorations'

Ninfa Leonardia I can no longer remember how many people, women especially, expressed to me their great relief in seeing that the ugly sight of those old rubber tires, painted in dismal colors and used as decorations in some city streets has finally been removed. They said it always hurt their eyes whenever they saw those atrocities, and also wanted to know who was the person responsible for them in the first place. I said I am not sure, but I did hear a name mentioned with the information that those tires and rubber flower (ugh!) pots had cost the city some P3 million! Who took them away, and were they recycled for sale again?

***

Really, those eyesores had also attracted foreign visitors and balikbayans, some of whom did not hesitate to call them “baduy” or “buki”. I can't think of a proper translation for those terms, so let's leave it there. And let us hope that nobody in the city council now has the kind of breeding that would call such unsightly items “decorations”. Meanwhile, let's face it: there are just too many vehicles in Bacolod City. Car manufacturers are raking it in, with so many buyers of their latest models. These could be signs of progress, but how do we keep up?

***

A few days ago, we were approaching the Burgos Market intersection when the light was about to turn green. But the numbers were rolling down and we still could not move until they turned red again. The reason? Three trisikads were leading the line of cars and vans and, because of their slow pace, only two or three vehicles ahead of us could go through. Shouldn't there be a measure prohibiting trisikads in busy sections of the city? Tricycles are bad enough, but at least they move faster.

***

Why is the world shaking so much and so often? After those earthquakes reported in Japan and other countries, another bad one hit Italy last week, where more than 200 people were killed. The area where it struck were mountain villages in Central Italy. The town mayor confirmed that at least three hamlets (maybe the counterpart of our barangays) just completely disintegrated. People got buried in the rubble, and several could not be pulled out on time. Maybe those living in nipa houses have better chances for survival in such calamities.

***

I read with great interest the article in the Daily Inquirer about how baggage loaders at airports do their tricks in stealing items and valuables from the luggage of passengers. The item mentioned tricks like using ballpens to bore into zippers of bags to open them and fix them later. It also said the thieves could be in cahoots with security guards. But it did not mention one trick which, I think was played on me on my trip back from Las Vegas a few years ago.

***

Our flight was delayed, and instead of landing in the morning, we arrived in Manila at night. We were not very inconvenienced because the staff checked us in at the Century Park Hotel, with which I was familiar, being the venue of some seminars of the media. We only had our handcarried items with us because all our luggage had been left at the airport to be retrieved upon arrival in Bacolod. When I got home next day, I noted that seven signature shirts I had bought for my brothers and nephews were no longer in my balikbayan box.

***

I checked with my cousins in the U.S. if I had left anything at their house, but they said no. It was a puzzle I could not solve, but never did I suspect monkey business. It was only much later – and too late to complain – that a cousin to whom I told the story, made me realize what must have happened. She asked if I had checked the bottom of my box when I got it, because this is one of the ways the thieves operate. They remove the reinforcing tape at the bottom, open the box, forage in it, and then seal it with similar tape! Ah, the ingenuity of thieves!

***

Well, what do you know! My favorite NBA player is now a big businessman. News in the business page of a national daily said he has just moved to Wall Street and has formed a $100 million capital fund to invest in media, technology and data companies. So far, the company has already made big investments on entrepreneurs. Well, considering that Forbes has reported that Kobe Bryant earned no less than $680 million during his career in basketball, $100 million is just peanuts for him.*

 

 

back to top


   
  Email: visayandailystar@yahoo.com